Baggy Wrinkles

Baggy Wrinkles
S/V Nautica, Hull #614, Built at Whitby Boatworks Ltd., Ontario, Canada 1977, one of the most recognizeable Carl Alberg designs. A masthead sloop displacing 9000 lbs, keel hull, Yanmar 15 hp diesel, LOA 30.27 Beam 8.75, Draft 4.29, roller furling headsail, tiller, berths for 4, interior teak bulkheads, teak cap rail and cockpit teak coamings, 12 volt lighting, aluminum mast support, Harken self tailing winches, in its day was designed for customers as a Cruiser-Racer, the Alberg 30 remains a Classic design of the large Alberg inventory.

Pageviews since BaggyWrinkles started:

Tuesday, August 6, 2013

Scuppers, sea-cocks, and strainers.  Probably the most complicated part of the Cape Dory Typhoon Weekender model is this combination of characters.  Although simple, a critical piece of hardware in this otherwise simple sailing design.

So, a couple of posts back, I told the tale of the water leaking into the bilge of the Baggy Wrinkles and my frantic race against plastic and pressure.  I succeeded in stemming a disastrous flooding of the Dory that day.  It was all about the sea-cocks and the plastic tubing attaching to the cockpit drain pipes which then lead through-hull to the scuppers to pass excess water back to the sea.

Behind this was my obsessive compulsive attempt to turn my dingy bilge area below decks into a clean and visible place of functional design.  Or so that was my thought.  But I did complete my mission after searching for just the right hoses and this is what it looks like now:

Clear braided 1 and 3/8ths inch flexible hoses with metal clamps.  Just enough length to allow bending without crimping.
 
Neat, isn't it?  I recall touring the Her Majesty's Yacht (HMY)  Britannia in 2008, which at the time, was docked in the port in Edinburgh, Scotland, and showed-off its gleaming white and impeccably clean engine room:


I think it was at that moment I thought to myself that this was the way to keep an engine room!  After more than one million miles at sea, now resting peacefully dockside, she is clean enough to eat off the floor.  To keep it clean from us tourists, they partitioned-off the area with Plexiglas, thus the reflections in this photo of mine.  Worth the tour if you're ever in Scotland.  Plus, they cook their own brands of chocolate aboard and sell these for a modest amount while you're on tour. ( It's worth looking at the link--HMY Britannia )

Well, the Cape Dory is a far cry from the Britannia however!  But just the same, she's my vessel, I'm her Captain, and I'll maintain her at a high standard!  Well, as I said, this is the only mechanical place on the Typhoon but it is one of the critical points of interest on the vessel.  If the hoses fail, the water comes aboard, and due to the fact that the waterline is above the base of the cockpit, it becomes a serious focus!

Above decks I'd been searching for just the right device to install some sort of screens on the cockpit drains.  On a very old sailboat, finding just the right size is futile.  Yet, I found it:

The simple sink strainers are just a bit over two inches in width and sit nicely in the passageway to the hoses due to the finger or bell-shaped screen formation which reaches into the hole.

Ok, so it's not a big deal, but yes, it is a big deal, because there are debris items that can easily find their way into these hoses and then clog the passageway to the through-hull and the relief the scuppers provide.  The passageway has to be kept clean and free of debris.
How many times do I have to remind myself that this is a limited production boat and an old boat?  So this then requires ingenuity in order to fix and repair.  Some of these products, like the above braided, clear hose, probably did not exist in 1974 when this Cape Dory was produced.  As you can see in this photo, I found the answer to my problems of screening debris, at Home Depot  (in the US, found everywhere humans are located) in the sink department.  These strainers cost me about two dollars 50 cents apiece--about 1 Euro 90 cents for European readers and maybe 1 Pound 60 cents in the UK?  These will sit in the drain hole in the cockpit and provide protection for the hoses and the through-hull so that the scuppers only have to deal with liquid.  Otherwise, there might be leaves, sticks, pieces of broken fiberglass, M&M candies, and certainly, that inevitable screw or bolt which jumps from my hands with such speed that I cannot catch it as it races for the drain hole.  And that, will happen.
 
Then there are the scuppers.  These are openings in the hull of the vessel that enable water to escape a ship while underway.  See if you can find the scuppers in this early photo of La Belle Vie before I cleaned her hull:
 
 
It is located just a bit above the grey metal post and a bit to 1 o'clock position.  This photo shows the hull in the process of being scraped of barnacles and power-washed of salt water scum.  On the right, a scupper.  A rather ugly little fellow, but effective!  The scuppers are probably a bit much for a Typhoon since most of the water spraying the deck while underway seems to come over the bow and find its way out the leech holes in the toe-rail.  Nonetheless, if it can find a way into the vessel, it will, and it will meet the scuppers.  That black boot-strip in the photo was washed away while cleaning.  However, the sea-cocks below decks are beneath that line.  So the water will seek a way in if not kept at bay, sort of a pun isn't it?
 
The sea-cocks are actually a life saver.  They provide the possibility of draining the cockpit if all the other equipment is fully functional.  If you have not been too clever as I was and your securing bands are solidly in place, the seacocks can remain open and enable the sea to escape your cockpit and keep your feet dry.  In the previous entry I was actually able to turn the sea-cocks off so that water could not enter the cockpit from below.  I did not say this in the entry but it enabled me to find a solution without threat of the vessel taking on an enormous amount of water.  And this is practically the most complicated device on the Typhoon! 
 
Scuppers, sea-cocks and strainers, a simple and vital connection!